It was so great to see you again today at the UWA Envirofest and I am so impressed and thrilled that Millennium Kids is still alive!
Like I mentioned today, I was a Millennium Kid through the Penrhos school program when I was in year 5 (so 10 years old). That program and the other sustainability activities we did in that class taught me how important it is to look after the Earth and inspired me from an early age to be more sustainably minded! I now love spreading the word about healthy, eco-friendly living through my work at Urban Revolution Australia and am studying mechanical engineering at Curtin University with the dream of working in the renewable energy industry. I am also living a very low-waste lifestyle (the dream is to be completely zero waste!) and eat completely plant-based.
I love my eco-friendly lifestyle and am really passionate about it. I really do believe that those programs and activities as a kid inspired this love for the Earth in me so THANK YOU for keeping Millennium Kids going and inspiring even more kids!
Happy to chat any time.
Kind regards,
Dana

Nathan sent us his story:

Nathan did some research on Oblong turtles after a Green Lab workshop with Millennium Kids.

“Oblong turtles live in Perth and throughout the south-west of Western Australia. They are also known as western long necked turtles or snake necked turtles. They are different from most turtles as their shell is not round. Oblong turtles are dark brown to black, with a paler under shell. These carnivores feed on anything small enough to seize and swallow, such as fish, tadpole, crustaceans, insects and carrion. They hunt by ambush, using the long neck to strike in a snakelike manner while gaping the mouth to suck in prey.”

See reference below.

A lot of them live in Perth at Lake Douglas. Oblong turtles like to lay their eggs in sandy patches along the lake. One problem is there are No sandy patches at Lake Douglas!

Without sandy patches for breeding this endangered species cannot survive. There are a few sandy patches but not enough to support an entire population of these amazing creatures. We can help this by making more sandy patches. But for that we will need a lot of sand. This may cost a lot, but we can try getting it for free at a place such as Soils aint Soils, which is a big soil company. Then our school team and Millennium Kids could use the sand and make some sandy patches.

Maybe if we could do that then oblong turtles are saved!

Check out more Oblong turtle facts here Backyard Buddies

Nathan, Year 4

Editor’s Note: Nathan is taking part in a Green Lab workshop series at his school. He wrote to Millennium Kids to see if he could get help for his project idea. Millennium Kids will explore this issue with Nathan and we will see what we can do to help the local Oblong turtle population.

Can we please put clean water in Lake Tonduit because, if we don’t the fertilizer will make the algae grow and then that causes algal blooms. Algal blooms are a threat to fish and humans. The reason this is a threat to humans is because a person might catch a fish in Lake Tonduit or the river that is poisoned by the algal blooms and then he might eat it and then he’ll get poisoned too.

But worst of all Millennium Kids figured out that Lake Tonduit leads to Lake Douglas and Lake Douglas leads to the Swan River so when Lake Tonduit gets contaminated, all the other lakes get contaminated as well and we won’t get to swim, row or eat the fish in the area, and we will have to wake up to horrible black and mucky water on a beautiful day.

Blake, Year 4

Hi my name is Toby.

I like going to the beach.

I like to clean up.

I like the stickers on the bins at the beach in Busselton.

I went home and made a sticker for our bin.

Please put your waste in the right bin.

Two schools and a visit to a native animal rehabilitation centre! Well we expected to be volunteering at the One Thousand Actions for the Planet workshops but we didn’t expect the visit to the native animal centre. We spent a cool day with Cat, CEO of MK, learning about the One Thousand Actions for the Planet workshops at Rossmoyne Primary School and John Tonkin College. Kids had a lot to say about their world and how they could help make change. The aim of the program is to get kids thinking about local, regional and global issues and then make a plan to create a change making program. These projects will be registered on the new MK website and link to the UN Sustainable Development Goals.

In between school visits we had a picnic by Bibra Lake, waste free of course, and we dropped by the native animal rehabilitation centre because kids care about our wildlife. It was so cool meeting the dingoes and seeing how MK works.

If you want to volunteer with Millennium Kids email info@millenniumkids.com.au – there is always something interesting going on.

Over the last five nights Millennium Kids have stepped up and spoken about their concern for climate change at Kwongkan Sand – a performance by Ochre Contemporary Dance Company at the Fremantle Art Centre.

Cloe spoke last night. She met with Phil, Ochre Contemporary Dance Company to discuss her role before the show.

This was Cloe’s  first ever public speaking event.

She felt it was important to have a say.

Kaya wanju wanju

I acknowledge the Traditional Owners of the lands, the Noongar people, where Perth now stands, pay respect to their Elders – past, present and emerging

I would like to begin with an aboriginal proverb : We are all visitors to this time, this place. We are just passing through. Our purpose here is to observe, to learn, to grow, to love… and then we return home.

This quote shows how wise Aboriginal people’s approach to life was and how much reverence they had and still have for the earth.

This ancestral wisdom that all Aboriginal populations had, allowed them to thrive for millennial.

But as our current civilization is growing, this sort wisdom is slowly being forgotten.

Many of us think that progress and scientific consensus are the only things we need in order to live prosperous lives.

But in less than a 100 years, our current post-industrial civilization has had more impact on the earth and the climate than the 200 thousands years before then.

It is an acknowledgment of the fact that the threat of climate change is assuming critical proportions.

Each and everyday, new events related to the uncontrollable effects of climate change and habitat destruction are taking place all over the world.

Now we find ourselves barreling down the highway towards mass extinction, increasingly erratic weather patterns and extreme temperature fluctuations.

In the news last week we learned, that the last for 4 years have been the hottest in record.

Climate change is not a matter of perspective or political standpoint.

It has been acknowledged as the biggest threat to the survival of our planet and human kind. This is why it should concern every single one of us.

But especially young people.

And as a young person, I am concerned.

I am scared to live in a world where the variety of plastic in the ocean will be as diverse as the remaining species of coral in the great barrier reef.

Where the landscapes of my childhood will become the new expansion plan of a coal mine.

Where my future as a human being will be compromised by the mistakes of the generations before me.

To all the adults here, did you have to worry about those issues when you were my age ? Is it fair for me and all the children in the world, to bear the mistakes of our predecessors or suffer the consequences of bad political idleness?

Its effects will not result in the loss of some points on the stock market or some votes in a political campaign but in the downfall of our humanity.

But it does not have to be that way:

We all have been told that the problem of climate change is too big to handle and that we are too small to do anything. But what I have a learned in my short life, is that we are never too small to make a difference.

Our everyday choices, to the food we consume to the clothes we wear, can make such a big impact on nature, the climate and people’s lives.

In the past few years, an environmental revolution has started to take place in all over the world.

People driven off by the envy of changing this future into something so positive and so powerful are leading this environmental revolution.

In Sri Lanka: Seacology, a nonprofit environmental conservation organization, is helping Sri Lanka become the first nation in history to preserve and replant all of its mangrove forests.

In Australia:Monash University,Australia’s largest university, has committed to reach net zero emissions by 2030 for all of its Australian campuses.

But you don’t have to be a genius or to come up with the schemes an amazing machine to change the world.

Most of all, we need to reshape our way of thinking.

We have to be capable of transcending our indifference and apathy for our planet and our climate.

Every great revolution starts from within.

Just broadening our horizons and opening our minds to new possibilities in terms of positive change and green innovations can make such a big impact on us and those around us.

And as we know our thoughts become our words and words become our actions.

And it is our common actions that are going to dictate who we are and who we will be as a single Humanity.

So let our actions to be filled with respect and ancestral prescience for the Earth and the climate as it will shape our future and the future of generations to come.

After all:

We are all visitors to this time, this place. We are just passing through. Our purpose here is to observe, to learn, to grow, to love

Kaya, I am Cloe, I am 16 and I am a millenium kid. Thank you.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hey MK Crew

Maybe you can help?
Today I am outraged! I bottled peaches this morning and now have these stickers gracing the fruit boxes, floor and kitchen sink. 11 peaches = 11 stickers for these two jars of preserved peaches. To add insult to injury these came directly from an orchard as seconds and some didn’t have stickers. I am bitterly disappointed – why do we need to label each piece of fruit? I am so over eating an apple and finding a portion of a label in my mouth. Surely the grower details on the fruit boxes at point of sale is adequate Quality Assurance and traceability?

Maybe we should label individual carrots,potatoes and onions with grower number and variety?????? But wait we could go nuts, pardon the pun, and label all walnuts, Brazil nuts and whatever nuts are on sale!

Can MK save our planet from fruit stickers? What solutions do you have for this wicked problem?

Anna B – MK Alumni

#1000actionsfortheplanet #responsibleproductionandconsumption

Hi I am Issy and I have always been a person who loves nature and animals and I always want to help them. We went to Bali for a holiday and I know for a fact their beaches and streets are full of rubbish. Immediately I wanted to do something about it so I asked my Aunty Emma if we could do a beach clean up. We searched on line for a charity called Trash Heroes, they clean up the beach every week on Monday. When we went to help out we and found a huge amount of rubbish. My heart instantly sank and I thought we would never be able to clean up the area. There were only about 20 people there but we did an absolutely amazing job.

I also try to help the BAWA Bali which helps Bali dogs. They have lots of dogs they help feed and home.

I also join Clean Up Australia Day every year. We try to get as many people as possible to help out at our local beach. I absolutely love all animals and will do anything I can to help them. If you see something that isn’t right, then make sure you help out in some way.

Join the Movement! 

What are you doing? What can you do? What will you do? Do you need our help? Tell us about your action or project. Send us an email info@millenniumkids.com.au

#1000actionsfortheplanet #lifeonland #lifebelowwater

I rather like the secret grove of paperbarks on the river. It is a great place for imagining – imagining what the river was like before colonisation, asking the big questions:

How has it changed over time?

What will it look like in the future?

I take students to this little secret place of mine because their imaginations go wild, too. You can see it in their faces as I set the scene. Walk quietly, listen to the sounds. Close your eyes, imagine the past, the birds, the families who hunted here, the Chinese who managed the market gardens. I share stories of swimming in the river, the birds, the people I have met who have shared their stories, too.  Of Tom Hungerford as he opened the gate in the cold of the morning to look for cows, of Uncle Noel Nannup teaching me Nyoongar names, of the spirits that sit above the trees watching over us as we talk about the role of custodians, carers for our river, now and in the future.

Today was no different.

The students talk non stop on the way back to the classroom:

  • Does dog poo make the river sick?
  • Did you see the chitty chitty?
  • Will those trees be affected by climate change?
  • Why did people take the trees out?
  • What poison is in the cigarette butts?

These questions will form the basis of the next 9 weeks of Green Lab, where students from Wesley College will explore the river alongside scientists, artists and elders to learn about the area and make a plan to care for country. They’ll even get to meet Prof Lyn Beazley AO, Chief Scientist for WA 2006 – 2013.

Cat CEO Millennium Kids

For more information about how your school can get involved in this program email info@millenniumkids.com.au

#1000actionsfortheplanet #responsibleconsumptionandproduction

How nice is it to be out and about with the warm summer weather!! There are so many places you can go at the moment to have a meal from a food van- they are at our local Saturday farmers markets, twilight markets and food truck nights in the local park. You can go along, eat, listen to music and have a look around, but have you thought about the waste they generate?

All vans use disposable plates – mostly cardboard and plastic cutlery, so even though some of them biodegrade imagine how much waste each event makes?

We have decided to take our camping plates and forks as well as a sealable container to do our bit for the Waste Free Movement. We also ride our bikes which saves us time in the traffic, finding parking and the ride home in the dark is always an adventure!

What can you do for the MK Waste Free Movement?

MK Reporters in Action – Pheonix and Ebonie